Cross-Arts Practice

um weiter zu kommen, mussten die Segler zur Zeit der grossen Entdeckungen lernen, zu kreuzen!

to reach new territory, the sailors had to learn to cross at the time of the great discoveries!
— Renald Deppe Interview, 2018.

The cross-arts process is a unique dialogue between creative minds attempting to realise new manifestations of society and the ever morphing journey of co-existence. As much as the term ‘Cross-Arts’ is defined it is immediately re-defined due to the fundamental specific needs of the individual voices involved.

In our attempts to shed light on this process within a 2nd cycle context we have brought together the voices of several practitioners that inspire and enlighten us within this topic.

An interview is about the transfer of information, a bi-directional exchange of thoughts, learning, beliefs and wisdom. We are continuing this channel of communication in order to inform our future work and to aid in the development of new art.

The following interviews will hopefully guide you in our explorations of the working practises, advise and issues experience by our talking heads along their creative journey. We have based these interviews on four primary questions:

  • Could you describe your artistic practice?
  • What defines your practice as being cross arts?
  • How are you approaching cross arts collaboration(s)?
  • What have been your key learning moments related to cross arts making or collaboration?

We also added the 5th investigative question, why? 


Chris Paul Daniels

chrispauldaniels.com


FULL INTERVIEW

by Guy Wood

 

DEFINITION

I don’t know if my practise is X-Arts, filmmaking by definition is collaborative. What’s more of a x-arts approach is my work in live video performance.
— CPD

YOUR PRACTICE

The most defined part of my practise that is X-Arts is my work in live settings with mixed disciplines, as an artist filmmaker X-Arts becomes it’s own terminology.
— CPD

APPROACHES

I am an artist filmmaker, which is a useful term because of the kinds of film I make which aren’t particularly conventional that are shown in art spaces, cinemas and festivals that are sympathetic to experimental films practises and I work with musicians in a live context.
— CPD

LEARNING

Realising that it is not just about you.
— CPD

WHY?

Every time I’ve done a project with musicians its set me up for working in a better collaborative way in things like short films.
— CPD

 

 


FULL INTERVIEW

by Berglind María Tómasdóttir

 

DEFINITION

I make music to look into the inner lives of things.
— CC

YOUR PRACTICE

I make music using traditional musical instruments and also everyday objects and recorded sounds and texts, and people moving around and speaking, and rhythms of light and dark.
— CC

APPROACHES

I think most of my training is as a composer because that’s what my degree is in. So, in some ways it frames my outlook and sort of basic catalogue of techniques.
— CC

LEARNING

When I was developing as an artist I was always in conversation with people who were visual artists or art historians and making work with them and just exchanging ideas in the classes we were doing and hanging out, so I suppose my work is cross arts or could be called that, in that it’s not only using the traditional ingredients of classical music. I work with different media, just depending on the piece.
— CC

WHY?

Because I think no matter of people’s official training, there are always parts of their personality that are unique and that you find out, in the course of working together, are really useful and should be featured in whatever you’re doing.
— CC